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Downloads

General

Key Facts / Company Information (download pdf | view on screen | download all docs as a zip file)

For Transport Managers

Recovery Net presentation letter (download pdf | view on screen | download all docs as a zip file)
Statutory recovery fees - Case Studies (download pdf | view on screen | download all docs as a zip file)
Changes to strategic road network policy (download pdf | view on screen| download all docs as a zip file)

For Partner Recovery Agents

Recovery operators interested in becoming agents for Recovery Net should email us by clicking on the following link. We aim to get back you you within 24hrs on weekdays and 48hrs at weekends.


General

Key Facts / Company Information

Recovery Net
Albany House
45 Station Road
Stechford
Birmingham B33 9AX

Tel: 0845 539 9000
Fax: 0845 871 7001

email:

Introduction

Recovery Net is a company with masses of working knowledge of the technical and operational aspects of running a vehicle recovery system.

This experience has been built over many years by ensuring that the top level staff within the company have actually been involved 'hands on' the job, on many many occasions.

Capabilities (All services listed are available on a 24/7 basis)

Recovery of any vehicle, any size from anywhere in the UK
Commercial vehicle breakdown service
Proven accident recovery 'trigger system' solutions for business
Plant recovery
24/7 centrally based control centre
Complex management reporting and statistics available
30 minute target arrival time.

Key Contacts

Mike Smith: General Manager
John Marks: Head of network

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For Transport Managers


Recovery Net presentation letter

To whom it may concern

Date as Postmarked

Dear Sirs,

INTEGRATED VEHICLE RECOVERY SERVICES

                We trust that you have found the information on our website helpful in learning a little more about our company and its services which we hope will be of interest to your company in the event of a breakdown or accident involving one of your vehicles.

Using our nationwide network of contracted sub-agents we can offer you true nationwide coverage for accidents and breakdowns involving any type of vehicle from a motorcycle to a fully loaded commercial vehicle anywhere in the UK.

                We specialise in building bespoke recovery packages for blue chip customers, depending on their
requirements. Our goal is to integrate our vehicle breakdown and recovery services into your company structure to reduce your downtime as well as your costs, in an already unprofitable situation

                Such a scheme has many wide ranging benefits to the customer, and talking to us can help to remove some of the headaches that vehicle recovery often brings.

                If you have any further questions, or any special requirements, these should be directed to the undersigned. Each system is built to the client’s exact needs.   

We look forward to working with you and your company in the future.

Yours faithfully,

John Marks
Head of Network

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Statutory fees case studies

STATUTORY RECOVERY CHARGES (rev OCT 2008)
CASE STUDY 1
Time : 22:43hrs – Weather : Fine


Circumstances

A loaded articulated vehicle belonging to “Company X” was travelling Northbound up the M6 when the driver fails to notice the build up of traffic and does not have time to brake before impacting a loaded container vehicle that was in front. The cab of the vehicle belonging to Company X is substantially damaged. The driver of the vehicle is taken to hospital with serious injuries and Police Officers, who are deployed to the scene, immediately close lanes 1 and 2.

Scenario 1

The Police manage to trace the owner of the vehicle through the general contact number on the trailer. They are unable to make contact as the offices are now closed. Because the vehicle is clearly substantially damaged, and in order to get the motorway open as quickly as possible, they invoke their Statutory rights to order the vehicle’s recovery at the owner’s expense.
“Recovery company B” turns out and recovers the vehicle to their base on instructions of the Police, which is 2 ¾ miles off the motorway.

ETA to scene:  45 Minutes
Time Taken at scene:  1 hour
Total time taken from base to base : 1hr 45 Minutes.

Statutory charge under new regulations £4500

(1 incident controller and one heavy recovery vehicle being required)

Scenario 2

The Police see the sticker in the windscreen of the cab, and notice the following text:

In the event of an accident, please call “Company X’s Incident Line on 0845 123 4567.” The Police telephone this number and are greeted with Company X’s name.  The telephone controller then takes all the details and advises that recovery will be there within 30 minutes.

ETA to scene:  30 minutes
Time Taken at scene:  1 hour
Total time taken from base to base : 1hr 45 Minutes.

Average cost to customer £800*

(*Based on 1 incident controller and one heavy recovery vehicle being required)

NOTE :
The recovery company in scenario 1 are not overcharging. These are the fees laid down by the Home Office, and recovery operators acting on Police Officers invoking their Statutory powers must observe these rates. The only way around this is to offer the Police at scene a viable alternative as their main objective is to restore the flow of traffic as soon as possible.




STATUTORY RECOVERY CHARGES (rev OCT 2008)

CASE STUDY 2
Time : 1330hrs – Weather – Heavy rain


Circumstances

A loaded articulated vehicle belonging to “Company Y” was travelling on a trunk road when the driver swerves to avoid a hazard. The truck ploughs into a lamp post and slides off the road. The impact of the lamp post has caused substantial damage to the cab and has also trapped the driver’s legs, pinning him in the cab. Although the vehicle is upright it is axle deep in the wet verge on the side of the road.

Scenario 1

The Police contact the owner of the vehicle through the general contact number on the trailer.  Although they are able to speak to the company it is some 25 minutes before they are able to talk to anyone that can deal with this as the Transport Manager is on her lunch hour. When they do finally get to speak to her, she advises that as the vehicle is so far from base; her usual recovery company will take several hours to get there. The Police will want the vehicle moved and at this point will invoke their Statutory right to order the vehicle’s recovery at the owner’s expense.

“Recovery company C” turns out and recovers the vehicle to their base on instructions of the Police, which is 5 miles from the scene.

ETA to scene:  45 Minutes
Time Taken at scene:  2 hours
Total time taken from base to base: 2hrs 45 Minutes.

Statutory charge under new regulations £6000

(1 incident controller and two heavy recovery vehicles being required.)


Scenario 2


The Police see the sticker in the windscreen of the cab, and notice the following text:

In the event of an accident, please call “Company X’s Incident Line on 0845 123 4567.” The Police telephone this number and are greeted with Company X’s name.  The telephone controller then takes all the details and advises that recovery will be there within 45 minutes.

ETA to scene:  45 minutes
Time Taken at scene:  2 hours
Total time taken from base to base : 2hrs 45 Minutes.

Average cost to customer £2000*
(*Based on 1 incident controller and two heavy recovery vehicles being required)

NOTE :
The recovery company in scenario 1 are not overcharging. These are the fees laid down by the Home Office, and recovery operators acting on Police Officers invoking their Statutory powers must observe these rates. The only way around this is to offer the Police at scene a viable alternative as their main objective is to restore the flow of traffic as soon as possible.

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Changes to strategic road network policy

Changes to strategic road network policing
and the effect on the haulier


In 2008 two major changes happened in the UK

  • The Secretary of State for Transport's decided to transfer various tasks associated with management of the strategic road transport network from the Police to the Highways Agency. One of these tasks includes the recovery of stricken vehicles.
  • Statutory charges collected on behalf of Police Authorities for the recovery of vehicles were altered dramatically.

Before 2008, policing of the strategic road network was dealt with by the Police. However, for many years the number of available motorway Police units has been diminishing, which in turn means that it was always difficult for the Police to meet targets such as:

“Any vehicle on the motorway network that has been involved in a collision that has visible damage will be removed within 30 minutes”

As the number of available Police units has decreased over the years often the vehicle would be parked on the hard shoulder for quite some time before the Police were even aware of the incident. From the haulier’s point of view this was not always a bad thing as it bought the haulier precious time to arrange their own vehicle recovery, instead of facing the trauma of having their vehicle recovered through the Police ‘rota garage’ system.

It is estimated that there are 40% – 50% more Highways Officers on the Motorway Network in the UK than there were Motorway Police Officers before 2008. As well as this significant rise in manpower, the Highways Officers have fewer responsibilities than their Police Officer counterparts ever had. This means that the first knock on effect to the haulier is that in the event of a breakdown or RTC involving a haulier’s vehicle, there is a high likelihood that there will be a Highways Officer on scene much more quickly than before, which gives the haulier significantly less time to take action to keep control of the situation and their costs.

In addition to this, the Highways Agency also now has access to all the cameras on the motorway network, and are able to monitor the roadways, and respond even more quickly. In terms of the Government’s transport policy, this is a good thing. For the owner of a vehicle that requires recovery, sometimes it is not so good.

With the recent change in statutory fees for vehicle recovery, it is becoming apparent that hauliers are now facing statutory fees for recovered vehicles, even when the incident does not appear to be too major or difficult. See our case studies (enclosed) for examples of this.

“Hauliers can decrease costs and increase control by employing an quick response nationwide recovery deployment system, and effectively bypassing the Police / Highways rota recovery system.”

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